Are You A Writer – Check Out Which Type You Belong To?

Writer Wordart

Writer Wordart (Photo credit: MarkGregory007)

Are You A Writer – Check Out Which Type You Belong To?

Are you one of those few people who find it very easy to put down their thoughts on a piece of paper? Can you visualize a scene and know the words that would best describe it? If you are one of these people, then it seems that you have the ability to write. Just knowing a language is not enough to make anyone a writer. Writing requires an ability to put together words in a way that is most effective. This quality is a pre-requisite for anyone interested in becoming a writer. Once you decide to become a writer, it may be at first a bit intimidating to figure out where to start from. One thing that will help you to find out what kind of writing you can do is to know the various types of writers and the kind of work they do. The different types of writers are mentioned below –

* Business writers write for business magazines. This involves writing articles related to the business world. It requires a certain amount of knowledge about the business, which has to be explained to the readers.

* Ghostwriters are those writers who write for somebody else and do not take credit for any of their work. These writers are paid a bit more, but the downside is that they do not have any claim on their work.

* Columnists are one of the most followed types of writers. They usually write articles regularly for a magazine or a newspaper on any particular subject. These people build a following of readers, who anticipate their next article.

* Freelance writers are those writers who write on a variety of topics and choose whatever business that comes their way. These are the most versatile type of writers, as they need to build up their knowledge on a wide variety of topics.

* Journalists are the most widely recognized type of writers there are. The journalists write fact based material that they get via thorough investigations. This kind of writing requires the maximum amount of research.

* An author’s work is the most demanding, as he has to build up a whole story and plot from his own imagination. A good author has the ability to not only capture the attention of a reader but also get him hooked on to the book and prevent him from putting it down.

After reading about these types of writers, one can see the different types of writing that presents so many avenues for a rewarding career. The secret to a successful content writer’s career is to identify the strong points and concentrate on those areas. Do not try and do everything by yourself. The sooner you identify your niche, the better it will be for you.

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Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Shruti_S_Sharda

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Writing Rituals

As writers we know we are supposed to write every day so that we can get something done and polish our skills at the same time.  So what can you do to really get yourself into the habit of writing? Will writing rituals help you get the job done? According to the blog Procrastinating Writers Blog  there are some handy tips and advice to help you decide if writing rituals will help you keep on task.

Pen & Ink

Pen & Ink (Photo credit: mbgrigby)

This is a guest post by Rich Furman

One of the principles of writing productivity that most writers, writing coaches, mentors and researchers believe in is the power of daily writing.

Simple statements such as, “writers write,” typify this sentiment. Yet, in spite of having this knowledge, many writers and aspiring writers struggle with achieving the consistency of daily writing.

There are many tools that have been suggested for helping achieve the practice of daily writing, from starting each day with writing, ending each day with writing, or putting writing into your calendar and making it an appointment with yourself.

For some, these work; for others, they may not make a significant difference.

Why These Tools Don’t Work For Everyone

Part of the reason these tools don’t work for everyone is that these scheduling methods do not change anything about you.

What you need is a method that helps make you need to write, and creates a negative internal consequence when you do not. In other words, you need your writing to take on the hallmarks of an addiction.

Do I mean that writing should make your life spin horribly out of control? Of course not. You need to make your writing into a positive addition, or a habituated behavior that is supported by environmental, psychological and biological stimuli.

When you engage in a positive addiction, you experience a sense of meaning. When you do not, you feel a sense of loss, and may actually experience biochemical changes, just like with a less positive addiction.

Sounds complex and time consuming perhaps, but its not difficult. One of the most powerful principles in addiction treatment is that rituals often support people’s compulsive behavior, and can be used in creating behavioral change. 

What you need is to create behavioral rituals that support a dependence on writing.

With drug addiction, or behavioral addictions like gambling, rituals set into motion powerful biopsychosocial triggers that compel one toward a substance or behavior. This is why creating rituals for yourself, simple habituated, routinized behaviors that you do prior to writing, can help you achieve the consistency you need. Read more here.

 

R.E.A.D. 7 Tips For Writers

Before we are writers we are readers. Perhaps that is the one thing that encourages us to start a writing journey of our own. I’ve discovered some inspiring tips from Emma Dryden of the SCBWI. Her philosophies in regards to reading, expanding, adapting and investing in our writing are very useful.  Happy Writing!

Do you love reading? [Explored #28]

Do you love reading? [Explored #28] (Photo credit: Fiduz)

Staying on the Road: 7 Tips for Authors & Illustrators

I was asked recently by my colleagues in the SCBWI-Oregon region to share some inspirational thoughts for authors and illustrators. I am happy to share these remarks with a wider audience:
 
                          R.E.A.D.I.N.G.
Read.  Read as much and as often as you can. Read books within the genre and style in which you write.  Read books in genres and styles with which you’re less comfortable. Read aloud – from books you love, from books you don’t love, and from your own work – to learn about voice and narrative flow. Read in order to become a stronger writer.
Explore & Expand. Explore all options for yourself as a writer or illustrator—explore creative options and publishing options. Expand your thinking as a creative person to try new styles in your own work. Explore new avenues for the exchange of ideas and for inspiration, be it through social networking, critique groups, conferences. Expand yourself and expand your art – try something you’ve never tried before in your writing or artwork.
Adapt. Adapt to change. The creative environment and the publishing environment are underdoing significant changes right now and it’s critical to remain as adaptable as possible. Be flexible and open to new ideas, new strategies, and new business models.  Be flexible and open to new approaches to your own work. Adapting to the new environments in which we live and work doesn’t mean giving up any creative instincts; rather, it means expanding the possibilities for yourself and your work.
 
Diligence. Be diligent with your craft. Practice. Write and rewrite. Sketch and re-sketch. Be as diligent with revision as you are with the first draft of anything you create. And be diligent as the marketplace throws up its barriers: if you get rejected, keep sending out your work; if you get feeback, revise; if you have questions, take time to figure out the answers.
Invest. Invest in your work and in yourself. Figure out what you’re willing to invest in your craft and recognize it as an investment in your future, your career, and your confidence. Investment can be many things: saving up to attend a conference or two throughout the year; working with a freelance editor and designer to ready your work before you submit or self-publish; taking the time to research the marketplace, agents, and publishing options. Read more here.

The Structure of Story

English: a sample of altered book art

Image via Wikipedia

 

Getting ready to put a project on paper can be as easy as 1-2-3. Yeah, right! It’s not so easy putting your project to paper. Most of us don’t outline or write down the ideas we have about our stories beginning, middle and end. Some of us feel it will mess with the creativity of our story. I thought that at first. I’ve been stuck on a project more times than I can count only because I didn’t jot down the important parts of the story arc. So now, to remedy that I work on an outline. I get to know my characters and their personalities.

I visited K.M. Weiland’s site and she has some interesting words she has shared in regards to story and structure. I always love to visit her site. She has such great insight on the craft of writing. Her words always guide me and help me to better understand the process of writing.

The Secrets of Story Structure, Pt. 1: Why Should Authors Care?

What’s the single most overlooked, misunderstood—and yet most important—part of storytelling? If you cheated and looked at the title, you already know the answer is structure. Most uninitiated writers have two different reactions to the idea of story structure. Either they think it’s great, but too mystical and lofty to be understood by common mortals, or they think it’s formulaic hooey that will sap the art right out of their books.

I started out somewhere in the “huh?” camp that didn’t even realize there was such a thing as structure. From there, I progressed to reading complicated outlines that left me shaking my head. If that was structure than my story was practically written for me before I even came up with a decent idea. Thanks, but no thanks.

What I didn’t know—what most writers don’t know—is that even as I subjected the idea of story structure to ignorance and ridicule, I was actually structuring my stories without even realizing it. In the years since, I’ve been introduced to many theories of structure, all of which bear out the inevitable components found in all good stories, whether their authors deliberately structured them or were just lucky enough to wing it on their own good instincts.  Read more here.

 

The Writing Dream by Terri Forehand

I love stumbling across posts by writers. We all share the sames dreams and concerns of reaching those dreams that at times can seem so far away. Today Terri talks about her story and path to writing.

Following the writing dream sounds so simple. However, there are certain things that have to happen as you are following those dreams and all of that can be very overwhelming.  Did any of you think that all you had to do was write from your heart and a writing career would unfold?

In my very younger days, yes I believed that if I wrote from my heart there would be a publisher who would scoop up those words and make my name a household brand in the world of children’s books. Oh how wrong I was. First of all, no one liked my words without changing many of them and sometimes changing the entire idea. And so my journey began.

The thing about writing and writing dreams is that it takes work, hard work. There is the work of learning the craft, that in and of itself can take years.  Then after learning the basics of the writing craft, there is a continuing education aspect that every writer must remember so never to loose site of honing the craft. I am finding new learning experiences with every assignment.