How To Write Your Author Bio

An authors bio tells a lot about them. At Book Works there are some handy tips indie authors can use to help make their author bio just right.

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Indie Authors Need to Highlight Themselves

When people read your book, they read you.

When I read a book, I seek out the “about the author” page. Many one-paragraph author bios are not especially enlightening or entertaining, and I don’t expect a full scale memoir, but even the briefest can tell me something about the author’s relationship to the book, and sometimes give me a reason to search out their other titles.

Consider offering the reader more than just the usual name, city of residence, occupation and when you started writing.

In one blog post, writer TA Sullivan recounted waffling about whether to write a bio for her own book, then reflected how she scanned the bios of other writers as she chose books at a store or library. “Nowadays, I still check out the author’s bio when looking for a book to read. Clever bios, witty bios, or even sincere bios can help me connect with the author, which then makes taking a chance on their book seem not quite so chancy. An author’s bio can help remind the readers that you (the author) are a person, too,” she said.

Her point has statistical backup at Smashwords. The giant ebook distributor said on its website, “In 2011 when we surveyed ebook buyers and asked them their most common decision factor that guided how they discover and purchase books, the #2 answer, accounting for 18% of respondents, was that they first look for books from their favorite authors. This speaks to the importance of author as brand. Your “brand” is what you represent to your readers, and how your readers perceive you and your ability to write great stories.” READ MORE HERE.

NaNoWriMo For Beginners

I’ve known about NaNoWriMo for a while now but this is the first time I’m actually participating. I can tell you that these first few days have been brutal. I thought I could push out the 1667 words per day challenge like a pro. NOT!! It was a chore the first day to get over 500 words on the page and I know where I want to go with my story. Geeezzz! Anyway, Kris Noel has some great advice for the first time NaNoWriMo participant. Happy Writing!



I’ll be covering a variety of topics for NaNoWriMo, but it seems like a lot of people want to know how to approach their first time writing a novel in a month. It can be scary and it might feel like an impossible task, but I’ll try to help in any way I can!

First, let’s talk about what NaNoWriMo is. NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month and it takes place in November (there are other versions of NaNoWriMo, but this is the big one). First time writers, seasoned professionals, and everyone in between, attempt to write the first draft, or no-draft as I like to call it, in a single month. The goal is 50,000 words. That means that usually a lot of planning has to go into it a few weeks before.

Here’s some advice that I hope will help first time NaNowriMos get started:

Outlines are important

I know some of you might not like writing outlines because you feel it restricts you creatively, but it’s a fairly important step for NaNoWriMo. You only have a month to write, so you better have some idea what you’re writing. Start off with the general plot and your characters and go from there. Having an outline will help you stay on track and will keep writer’s block at bay. Read more here!