Book Giveaway: The Self-Publisher’s FAQ

The publishing industry has been changing a lot in the last few years. It’s not a bad thing. It’s actually good for anyone who has always wanted to self-publish a book. Author Jacqueline Church Simonds has put together a perfect guide for anyone who has questions and is unsure of how to proceed. Simond’s guide has chapters that cover questions you may have about publishing, publishers, assembling your manuscript, social media, how to get reviews and more.

 

For a chance to win this copy please leave a comment, name and email. Offer expires 7/19/14.

 

One question that many writers have is, “Should I print hard copies of my book…or should I just do an ebook?” Simonds provides excellent information for this question in Chapter 7 titled “Printing a Paper Book.” According to Simonds, “The old model also supported first producing a hardback book, then six months to a year later a paperback version. Big publishers still follow this model. Self-publishers do not. For many self-publishers, the best move is to print via the POD method and offer ebooks. In this manner, you can keep your upfront costs low and concentrate your available cash on marketing your book.” Simonds also covers, in Chapter 7, the process regarding book size, print type, binding and cost. She answers more detailed questions about ebooks in Chapter 8.

If you are a writer who wants to know, “Do I have to have a Press Kit?” Simonds states, “No. If you’d rather save on paper and shipping, you might consider creating a one-sheet with an image of the book, short summary, endorsements, reviews, short author bio, picture, and all the book data.” Simonds helps anyone who wants to self-publish a book or perhaps has specific questions, get the answers. Each chapter covers topics you will need to know. Step-by-step information will walk you through each process. The back of the book has a countdown of where you should be in a particular time-frame. For example: She gives you 9 months to finish writing your book and researching the market. By month 12 you should start setting up your publishing company and so on.

Jacqueline Church Simonds has been a publisher for thirteen years, producing over twenty books, has worked over thirty-five publishing projects and was a book distributor handling at one point over forty titles.

Great Marketing Tips For Pintrest

If you’re not using Pintrest to market yourself it’s time to get started. Pintrest is a great way to show off your book covers, where you’ve been promoted and also to showcase your interests. Put your personality out there! It’s fun and a great way to connect with potential readers for your projects. Socialmouths shares some great tips on how to utilize Pintrest for marketing.

 

10 Tips to Improve Your Pinterest Marketing Strategy

 

Did you know 69% of online consumers who visit Pinterest have a clear intention of purchasing products?

So, are you making Pinterest part of the social media marketing strategy for your business?

If not, it’s still a huge opportunity for brand awareness and sales. The best part is, Pinterest has proven to be the most cost-effective for several industries.

According to Danny Maloney, CEO and co-founder of Pinterest analytics and management firm Tailwind

“Unlike Twitter and Facebook which connect users based on who they know, Pinterest connects people based on their common passion. This indicates users are able to view content which is more likely to be of interest to them, and are more likely to lead to purchase downstream.”

You may be asking yourself, how do I use Pinterest as a marketing tool? You need a consistent and strategic method to your pinning madness.

Before you start, ask yourself these 4 important questions:

  • Is your business visual?
  • Do you have access to images?
  • Is your target market primarily female?
  • Can your website be easily updated with images and content?

How do you develop the right Pinterest marketing strategy? Read more here.

 

 

Have You Considered Crowdfunding?

There is a new way for authors to get help, support and even readers for their projects and it’s called crowdfunding. If you don’t know what it is or not sure how to do it, Book Daily offers some great tips.

 

Crowd at Fair

Crowd at Fair (Photo credit: RaeAllen)

 

Crowdfunding: The Newest Step In The Publishing Process

In order to be successful in the book market, authors need to not only be good writers, but they need to be business savvy, too. Luckily, there are many tools available that can help an author succeed, and one of the newer options is crowdfunding. Crowdfunding is the practice of funding a project or venture by raising many small amounts of money from a large number of people, typically via the Internet.

First thing’s first. Publishing costs can accumulate quickly and if an author is self-publishing, they are personally responsible to pay for the costs out of pocket. This is where crowdfunding can become extremely beneficial to the self-publishing author. By providing authors with the means to raise funds before they begin the publishing process, crowdfunding greatly mitigates the risk and financial burden of publishing. Read more here.

 

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Are You Getting Paid To Write?

Money cash

Money cash (Photo credit: @Doug88888)

100+ Websites That Pay Writers

by Carol Tice

Let’s face it — most blogs don’t pay for guest posts. It’s considered a marketing activity by the writer, who gets a link back to their site.

That can be worth it, too. I’ve gotten some amazing connections and clients from blogging on popular sites.

But I believe writers should be paid for their work. And sites that take guest posts still get a piece of writing out of the deal.

So I did a crazy thing…

Back in late 2010, I did something sort of nuts — I decided to start paying for guest posts.

At the time, my audience was pretty small and I was still earning most of my living from freelance writing.

It didn’t make economic sense on the face of it. I just thought it was the right thing to do.

I needed to put my money where my mouth was. I hoped I might inspire (or is that shame?) some other bloggers into paying for posts as well. I also hoped being different from the norm by being a paying writing market might get this little blog some attention.

Read more here.

 

How to Narrate Your Audio Book With Expression

my headphones

my headphones (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

How to Narrate Your Audio Book With Expression

By 

Are you speaking your audio book as if you were reading it? Reading your book and narrating your book have completely different approaches. The process focuses on your different skills of communication. The most common mistake made when you read a passage out loud is to let your voice drone on through every word in a steady stream with little expression. For your audio version of your book you must use your voice as a tool of interpretation for the meaning behind the words that are written.

Here are three essentials to keep in mind when attempting to record your book or to narrate segments orally to an audience.

#1 is Organization: The first element you must ask yourself is: what am I thinking about in this section of the book? When reading a book you follow the words as your eyes cross each line on the page. You hold in your mind what the images are as the information evolves. It is a passive form of interaction because your eyes run ahead of your mind: you read then think. So, the key here is that you must avoid speaking your words in this pattern and not utter them on one pitch level, or cram too many words in at one time.

Compare this to speaking in conversation with someone. You automatically think first about something that you want to say, and then you speak it. You naturally group your words together according to the thought first. If you wish to tell your friends about something interesting, you allow your voice to get excited about it, and you chunk your thoughts randomly in conversation. Therefore, when narrating your audio text you need to group only one idea and the words belonging to that idea, then speak it. Take time to embrace each new idea. Speak as if you want your listener to feel the moment with you. If you do this, you will be reading more naturally and easily.

#2 is Expression: The second element is to take your thought segments and show surprise, excitement, curiosity, fear, joy, wonder, sadness, enjoyment, or any other emotions to give certain words the force that is needed. Your expression should be natural as if discovering the text for the first time. Think of the image that you may have seen before and reproduce it through your voice. You are using your thinking processes actively when narrating audio books and awakening the pictures in your mind to pass onto the listener through your tone.

To practise this skill of sensory expression, observe and imagine, and then describe any object of nature that you might encounter on a short walk outside your home; such as, a leaf, a flower, a bird, or a blade of grass. Speak expressively about the details of these items. Remember your listeners do not have the text of the book to check out the details. This is a great exercise to tune your voice inflection and observation skills. You use your breathing skills and tone of voice to create the pictures and feelings in the words of your book.

#3 is Pace: The third element to be aware of is the pace that you speak and the clarity of your words. Not all audio books contain descriptive environments or characters and dialogue which require extreme expressive tones. To narrate a documentary, an educational textbook, how-to manuals, or staff training materials, you still need to group the ideas or steps accordingly, and give expression throughout. However, you must be clear on the pronunciations of your words, or specialized industry terms and understand what the concept is. For example, any audio book of medical, scientific, engineering, or some other unique genre needs to be correctly and clearly spoken.

In addition, you will find that a slower pace works best so the endings of words are not dropped or rushed together. Your pace will only enhance your tone and your expression ranging from a serious tone of importance, to a neutral tone as a bridge, to an example, story, or data of information. Pace for speaking all types of audio materials whether fiction or non-fiction is important to the image, feelings, and facts that need to resonate with the listener.

The professional audio voice-over talent must use all the mental, physical, and vocal skills to get the right balance for the listeners. They are experienced oral readers trained in the skills of how to expand the capacity of breath control, how to group phrases to make it the ideas connect, how to find the key words to give expression with matching the pace, to give an overall tone that works.

If you have written your book and want to do the narration yourself, then be sure to get some professional coaching; or better still, hire a professional narrator. You want to match the high quality of your content to the high quality of your audio version. Your listeners will vary from people who listen while they drive, to busy people who can listen and multi-task, and to the blind who are studying school texts or listening to fictional literature. Voice-over skills for narrating your audio book can be learned but it’s not something that you can wing it and get it right!

Did you find this article helpful? If want a professional audio narrator, training, or personal coaching for vocal expression then check us out at http://www.VoicePowerTraining.com

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