Story World Tips

BRINGING YOUR STORY WORLD TO LIFE

When you mention world building to a bunch of writers, most are instantly going to think about fantasy worlds. Makes sense since that’s the genre that does the most world building from scratch, but every story needs a rich world, even if that world is set in the good old USA. Luckily, the same tricks genre writers use to flesh out their worlds can also be used by non-genre writers.A Room With a View

One of the strongest tools writers have for world building is our point of view character. She can ground the reader by what she sees and provide context for those details. She can show what’s normal and what’s unusual for that world by how she reacts to things. Just as readers have never been to Middle Earth, they might not have ever been to the Midwest. Sure, they’ll have a general idea what it’s like (corn, flat, farms), but imagine how much richer we can make that world if we treat it like the reader has never seen it before. Especially if our world isn’t what the average person thinks of when they hear the location. READ MORE HERE.

Author Exposed: Teko Bernard

I am proud to introduce and author who has inspired me by showing me that I can be a writer and create a brand by being diligent and persistent in following my dream. Please help me welcome my cousin Teko Bernard!

Bernard Design

Bernard Design

About the Author

After an exciting career in the sportswear and sports event market, Teko set out to pursue his lifelong dream of creating the original kid’s lifestyle character brands Elmdale Park Kids™ and Hoop Kid®. Elmdale Park currently produces a unique brand of middle grade chapter books & active-wear.

As a kid growing up, much like my book’s protagonist Bernard Jones, I always loved books and playing basketball. Two of my favorite places were the basketball court and the library. Both places were my personal sanctuaries that gave me lots of joy and peace. While also, unbeknownst to me was enriching my life. Reading was exercising my mind and imagination, while playing basketball was keeping me physically and socially active,” says Teko.

However, by the time I reached middle school and then high school, my involvement in team sports began to monopolize my time. I had gotten so consumed with improving and getting better at basketball, I had almost totally lost site of the benefits and pleasure that books had always provided. Sadly, this pattern of more basketball, less reading would continue until the fall of my freshman year in college when I suffered a back injury that ended my college basketball career. Two life-changing things occurred after this, I started re-directing my intentions and focus towards things other than basketball for the first time in many years. I began reading more and re-discovered the pleasure and life changing effects that reading books provided. Reading has helped me so much throughout my life, that I felt compelled to create the Elmdale Park Kid’s brand and book series.

The idea was to help advocate the importance of a healthy, life-long, balanced diet of reading books and physical exercise. So kids who love sports are also benefiting from the magic of reading and kids who love to read are benefiting from the thrill of getting out there to play and being physically active.

Elmdale Park Books are created to entertain, educate and encourage kids. We want to give them access to books about the sports and activities that they love. We deal with a variety of themes including: courage, friendship, sportsmanship and teamwork to name a few. Elmdale Park Books reach out to a broad spectrum of kids from all backgrounds and experiences and cover a wide variety of stories, subjects and activities.

Currently, Teko Bernard resides in Overland Park, Kansas, where he works on his Elmdale Park brand. Find The HoopKid From Elmdale Park (ISBN:978-0-9860593-0-8, paperback, $7.19; ebook $2.99) at Amazon. Learn more at www.hoopkidonline.com and www.elmdalepark.com.

Elmdale Park Hoopkid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q&A

What is The HoopKid From Elmdale Park about? The story revolves around Bernard Jones, a smart and courageous 12 year old basketball fanatic who is visiting his Grandparents for the Summer. While he’s there he forms a basketball team and goes to battle against the local bullies in a high-stakes, inter-neighborhood tournament, to stop the ruthless Victor Franco’s cruel plot to shut down the historic Elmdale Park and turn it into a city dump for his own personal gain.

The title indicates the book has a sports based theme. Is this a book for both boys and girls? Yes, this book will appeal to boys and girls.In factthere is a really great girl character [Layla] on the team who is smart, funny and athletic.

What age group does it target? This book is for kids of all ages, but more specifically 8-12.

Why will children enjoy reading The HoopKid? It’s just a fun and book. We mixed the fun of cartoons and fantasy/science fiction with the exciting realistic action of basketball and applied it to a modern day David vs. Goliath story. 

What will children learn from the book? Children will learn the importance of teamwork, overcoming defeat, community and having courage to stand up for yourself and others.

Do you feel the story could help readers deal with bullying? Absolutely. Bernard has to deal with bullies in the story. And serves as an example of how speaking up, friends and family can help.

What experiences did you have in your own hometown recreation center that were similar to the story? While growing up,me and my brothers spent a lot of our days at the local community centers and playgrounds playing basketball. But fortunately we never had to play in a high-stakes game to save any of them from being turned into a city dump.

In what other ways do you encourage girls to participate in sports? We have a great girl character [Layla] in this story who exhibits a talent and passion for sports. We have another character named Nina who will also be in future stories who also loves to stay active playing sports.

Are you concerned that some children will not be encouraged or motivated by your characters? Yes, but I look at it as a challenge. My main goal is to create interesting and fun characters to resonate and connect with kids from a wide spectrum of backgrounds and experiences.

What will parents and teachers like most about this book? That our characters are creative and productive kids who have hobbies, interests and passions that don’t always involve a playstation.

What do you have next for The HoopKid? We are developing fun interactive programs to support the Hoop Kid book including a Hoop Kid reading club, Summer reading program and on-site Hoop Kid basketball clinics. We are actively seeking partners to work with. 

Thanks Teko so much for sharing with us today. To learn more about Teko’s book The Hoopkid From Elmdale Park stop by Kristi’s Book Nook where he is giving away a copy of the book and a t-shirt.

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Writing Schedules: Tips On Creating One

English: Book and apparatus for writing. Engra...

English: Book and apparatus for writing. Engraving (prints). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Creating a writing schedule is tougher than I thought. I have been struggling with this for a while now. Our busy lives at home can create a huge obstacle for us when it comes to our writing. Daily responsibilities can hinder our writing time in more ways than one. I’ve discovered a few sites that offer tips and suggestions on creating a writing schedule and how to be more productive with the little writing time you may have. Check out this Book TV video on how some writers schedule their writing. Happy writing!

Check out these 6 steps from R.A. Evans on starting out small and keeping motivated.

If you want to be a writer, you have to write. Sounds easy, doesn’t it? The hard part isn’t knowing what you have to do so much as it’s finding when to do it. Sure, you have to write, but you also have to pay the bills, spend time with your family, and take the occasional shower. There’s no shortage of things you want to do, either, from catching up with friends to watching Game of Thrones on HBO. It can seem impossible to fit writing in amid all your other priorities.

What’s a busy writer to do? Don’t give up! Follow these six simple steps, and you’ll find there’s time for writing in every single day. Read more here.

Linda Clare shares tips in regards to the seasonal you.

Writing Tip for Today: Your writing schedule will depend on the “season” of your life. Whether you have a day job, a gaggle of children to care for or you’re working on a college degree, these endeavors obviously drain a lot of your time. And published writers have deadlines to meet, meaning they’re crazy-busy at times. Yet it IS possible to create a writing schedule and stick to it. Here are a few thoughts on writing schedules at all stages of your writing journey: Read more here.

Writers Go For The Gusto!

I often wonder why I sometimes hesitate when it comes to writing. I want to jump right in and go for the gold, but there is this little thing that creeps up inside me and screams HALT! I get jittery because I am not sure that I am ready even though I am achieving so many wonderful writing goals. So what is it? Are we waiting for a pat on the back or perhaps someones permission to dive into the writing pool? Well, maybe. I came across and article from Cathy Stucker that helped me feel uplifted and ready to jump right in and go for the gusto! Enjoy!

Stop Waiting for Permission

March 17th, 2011

How do successful people become successful? They do things. Instead of sitting around waiting for the Permission Fairy to whack them upside the head with her magic wand, they just go out and do what they need to do.

I get a lot of questions from clients, students and others about how to do various things. Sometimes these questions are about the technical details of how to do something, but often the question is about how they go about getting permission to publish a book, become a consultant, create a course, etc. They want to know what course they need to complete, what group they need to join or who needs to give them a title before they can do what they want to do. While that is necessary if you want to be a doctor, in the world of entrepreneurs you do not need a license to succeed.

When someone is waiting for permission it is often because they do not have confidence in their ability to do something. The way to get that confidence is not to look to someone else. The way to get confidence in your ability to do something is to do it.

In the corporate world there are people who hand out titles and job duties. As an entrepreneur, you are the one who decides what your title is (if any) and what responsibilities you have. Want to be a published author? Write a book and get it published. Want to be a professional speaker? Get to the front of the room and start talking. Want to be a consultant? Start lining up clients you can help. It’s up to you.

There are people and educational resources to help with the things you do not know how to do or that you do not want to do on your own. However, there is no one who can give you permission. No one but you. Read more here.

Book Review – How To Write A Book Proposal

Writing a book proposal for the first time can make a writer‘s head explode. It’s that serious. Larsen does a great job of explaining the process. Although there are a lot of pages the book is a quick read. Writer’s can use this book to make an irresistible proposal, it shows you how to use models to make your book successful and helps you set literary and financial goals that will help you build a platform just to name a few.

Larsen points out how to hook a reader, how to search the market and look at your competition, how to build a platform and promotional plan and how to outline your book and so much more. Each chapter is filled with Hot Tips and quotes from professional writers. Readers won’t feel alone while going through this process. Larsen covers things to avoid and information for writing any type of book.

The back of the book has a Resource Directory which gives readers a list of agents, marketing sites, podcast directories, media lists and so much more. All of the links found here are a great resource to get a writer down the road to publication. Other resources include publicist and partnering your book. Readers will find sample proposals so that you can make sure you are on the right track.

Larsen has done an outstanding job of giving writer’s the help they will need with the long journey to publication.