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Don’t Forget to Write

Kristi Bernard:

A great post about handwriting.

Originally posted on Cognitioneducation:

Summer is winding down in my neck of the woods, where I am back at work getting ready for a new school year. As I sit at my desk today prepping syllabi and selecting readings, I am thinking about an essay I posted here about a year and half ago about memory processes (Memory: It’s all good). Turns out the essay provoked a bit of blog-o-sphere controversy. In it I stated, among other things, that writing by hand yields greater memorial outcomes than does typing. That is, if your aim in studying is to deeply process the material you should paraphrase and record the information with pen and paper, not with keystrokes. Typing, I said then, is an automatic process that stimulates little thought, whereas writing is an episodic process that engages your semantic memory system more deeply.

That portion of my memory essay caught the attention of…

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By Kristi Bernard Posted in Writers
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6 talks to watch for Book Lovers Day

Kristi Bernard:

What are you doing for Book Lovers Day?

Originally posted on TED Blog:

Chip Kidd designs book covers. Which makes today a good day to watch his TED Talk. Photo: James Duncan Davidson

Chip Kidd designs book covers. Which makes today a good day to watch his TED Talk. Photo: James Duncan Davidson

The Book. Few things are as universal, as ubiquitous and as transformative. On this Book Lovers Day, we’ve compiled talks that examine all the facets that make books great. Do you judge a book by its cover, like Chip Kidd, or get absorbed into a compelling narrative like Andrew Stanton? Were you taken to new lands by foreign authors like Lisa Bu or exposed to nuances of your own language by a master of vocabulary like lexicographer Erin McKean? No matter what gets you nose-deep in a paperback, all you’ll want to do after watching these talks is curl up in your favorite reading spot and crack open (or at least swipe through) your favorite book.

[ted_talkteaser id=1410]Chip Kidd: Designing books is no laughing matter. OK it is.

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By Kristi Bernard Posted in Writers

Are You Getting Paid To Write?

Navigating the internet to find paid freelance opportunities can be very overwhelming. Over at Make A Living Writing, Jennifer Roland shares a list of popular sites that pay writers for their work.

 

 

140 Websites That Pay Writers in 2014


By Jennifer Roland

Way back in 2010, Carol decided to bust a move here on the blog.

As an advocate for writers seeking out good-paying work rather than writing for “exposure” or pennies, she decided it was time to start paying the writers who guest posted here.

Then, something really cool happened. Other bloggers started paying their guest posters, too. Some were inspired directly by Carol, and some blog owners just decided on their own that great content was worth paying for. So Carol gathered a list of those blogs as a resource for her readers.

But things on the Internet change fast. Fourteen months later, it’s time to post an updated list. Read more here!

Book Giveaway: The Self-Publisher’s FAQ

The publishing industry has been changing a lot in the last few years. It’s not a bad thing. It’s actually good for anyone who has always wanted to self-publish a book. Author Jacqueline Church Simonds has put together a perfect guide for anyone who has questions and is unsure of how to proceed. Simond’s guide has chapters that cover questions you may have about publishing, publishers, assembling your manuscript, social media, how to get reviews and more.

 

For a chance to win this copy please leave a comment, name and email. Offer expires 7/19/14.

 

One question that many writers have is, “Should I print hard copies of my book…or should I just do an ebook?” Simonds provides excellent information for this question in Chapter 7 titled “Printing a Paper Book.” According to Simonds, “The old model also supported first producing a hardback book, then six months to a year later a paperback version. Big publishers still follow this model. Self-publishers do not. For many self-publishers, the best move is to print via the POD method and offer ebooks. In this manner, you can keep your upfront costs low and concentrate your available cash on marketing your book.” Simonds also covers, in Chapter 7, the process regarding book size, print type, binding and cost. She answers more detailed questions about ebooks in Chapter 8.

If you are a writer who wants to know, “Do I have to have a Press Kit?” Simonds states, “No. If you’d rather save on paper and shipping, you might consider creating a one-sheet with an image of the book, short summary, endorsements, reviews, short author bio, picture, and all the book data.” Simonds helps anyone who wants to self-publish a book or perhaps has specific questions, get the answers. Each chapter covers topics you will need to know. Step-by-step information will walk you through each process. The back of the book has a countdown of where you should be in a particular time-frame. For example: She gives you 9 months to finish writing your book and researching the market. By month 12 you should start setting up your publishing company and so on.

Jacqueline Church Simonds has been a publisher for thirteen years, producing over twenty books, has worked over thirty-five publishing projects and was a book distributor handling at one point over forty titles.

A Visual Guide To Writing

Sometimes reading about writing can get a little old. So, I found a video that will walk you through the process of writing. You may have seen this before, but take a moment to enjoy the efforts of the artist. It’s a bit long but worth every minute. Enjoy!