Are You A Writer – Check Out Which Type You Belong To?

Writer Wordart

Writer Wordart (Photo credit: MarkGregory007)

Are You A Writer – Check Out Which Type You Belong To?

Are you one of those few people who find it very easy to put down their thoughts on a piece of paper? Can you visualize a scene and know the words that would best describe it? If you are one of these people, then it seems that you have the ability to write. Just knowing a language is not enough to make anyone a writer. Writing requires an ability to put together words in a way that is most effective. This quality is a pre-requisite for anyone interested in becoming a writer. Once you decide to become a writer, it may be at first a bit intimidating to figure out where to start from. One thing that will help you to find out what kind of writing you can do is to know the various types of writers and the kind of work they do. The different types of writers are mentioned below –

* Business writers write for business magazines. This involves writing articles related to the business world. It requires a certain amount of knowledge about the business, which has to be explained to the readers.

* Ghostwriters are those writers who write for somebody else and do not take credit for any of their work. These writers are paid a bit more, but the downside is that they do not have any claim on their work.

* Columnists are one of the most followed types of writers. They usually write articles regularly for a magazine or a newspaper on any particular subject. These people build a following of readers, who anticipate their next article.

* Freelance writers are those writers who write on a variety of topics and choose whatever business that comes their way. These are the most versatile type of writers, as they need to build up their knowledge on a wide variety of topics.

* Journalists are the most widely recognized type of writers there are. The journalists write fact based material that they get via thorough investigations. This kind of writing requires the maximum amount of research.

* An author’s work is the most demanding, as he has to build up a whole story and plot from his own imagination. A good author has the ability to not only capture the attention of a reader but also get him hooked on to the book and prevent him from putting it down.

After reading about these types of writers, one can see the different types of writing that presents so many avenues for a rewarding career. The secret to a successful content writer’s career is to identify the strong points and concentrate on those areas. Do not try and do everything by yourself. The sooner you identify your niche, the better it will be for you.

For the best content writer choose the best content writer india today with Niche Writers

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Shruti_S_Sharda

Writing What We Know

Its been said over and over again, that writers should write what they know. I do that everyday. But, I am also influenced by other writers. If I am reading a favorite author ideas of my own creep up inside me and I have to jot them down. I also admire other authors works because of the creativity that had been put into their story. When I saw an interview with Stephen King, I couldn’t believe that a lot of his stories stemmed from dreadful periods in his life. On the other hand, you have writers who tell a story from some true incident that actually happened. But, I am sure they changed the names to protect the innocent.

Do you write what you know? What author sparks your creativity? I read a blog that covers what authors were most influential to her. Check out 12Most.com. The article “12 Most Comprehensive Writing Insights From Famous Authors.” I thought his insight on a select few authors and how they inspired her was interesting.

English: Langston Hughes, half-length portrait...

English: Langston Hughes, half-length portrait, seated, facing right, with right hand under chin. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

12 Most Comprehensive Writing Insights from Famous Authors

Posted by  on Oct 9, 2012 

  • As a writer, can you trace your roots? Just like musicians, we are influenced by the works of others. How much of your mentors do you see in your own writing?

The following are 12 lessons in writing I learned from my favorite authors.

1. Victor Hugo

Writing was a different type of gig when Hugo was alive. Authors salaries were dependant on length, which may explain why some classics come in at over a 1,000 pages. This could be why Hugo meanders through “Les Miserables” — an excuse to add his personal thoughts on Waterloo, religion, and slang.

2. Sir Aurthur Conan Doyle

Doyle published several short Sherlock Holmes stories in Strand Magazine. The serials were then collected into novels. This approach feels very similar to what I do as a blogger every day. Publishing tid bits of knowledge that can later be collected into anthologies.

3. Judy Blume

Reading “Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great” was the first time I saw a tom boy in literature. Blume’s books spoke to young girls about their fears associated with being teenagers. The young adult market is a big deal and one of the most lucrative for new authors.

4. F. Scott Fitzgerald

I love and despise “The Great Gatsby.” The characters are deeply flawed but the story is well written. A good writer can craft an enduring tale that is not dependant on our attitudes towards the main characters or themes. Read more here.

Writing To Live

Making a living as a freelance writer or novelist is a tough gig. If you aren’t aware of how to get started or what some of the terms truly mean help is here.  I love finding useful information for new writers and even for writers who are stumbling a little in the void. There is too much information out there and it’s difficult to grasp all of it. Over at Bubblecow, there is a terrific list of helpful terms and how you can utilize them in your real life writing.

English: Traditional freelance writer work system.

English: Traditional freelance writer work system. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

How To Make a Living as a Writer

Posted August 31, 2012 by  & filed under Get Published.

So you want to make a living as a writer? Well despite what some writers will have you believe traditional publishing still offers writers a realistic chance of making a living as a writer. However, it’s not easy and it takes some planning, but it can be done. So here’s how to make a living as a writer…

The Tools Needed to Make a Living as a Writer

Advance

To build any kind of meaningful discussion, I am going to need to work with generalisations. Forgive me for this, I know there are exceptions to these rules, but I have tried to stick to ‘real life’ as far as possible.

The first generalisation is that most books deals begin with an advance. This is a sum of money, paid by the publishers, to the writer prior to a book’s publication. This advance is exactly that, an advanced payment of royalties the book will (or should) earn. It is possible to negotiate a deal without an advance, but if an agent is involved then an advance will almost certainly be paid.

This brings us to our second generalisation, the size of the advance. Once again these vary greatly and depend on the book’s potential market, the writer’s potential selling power and the agent’s ability to negotiate. However, as a general rule of thumb, an advance for a debut novel will be anywhere between £500 and £10,000 (or more). Advances tend to be paid in two instalments. The first is on signature of the contract, the second is on delivery of the manuscript. Since we are generalising, I am going to use a figure of £5000 per book. In the US it is pretty safe to work with a figure of $10,000 per book.

Royalties

A royalty is the amount of money that a writer receives for each book that is sold. This sounds simple in theory but is painfully complex in practice. The writer will receive a percentage of… something. It may be the cover price or the price at which the book is sold to the trade, or something else determined by the publisher. Add to this, differing rates for different vendors, varying digital models and promotions and you can quickly see a complex mess of confusion arising from the gloom.

I know this will be controversial, but I would not build royalty payments, beyond your advance, into your immediate calculations. Many books never sell enough copies to earn back the money that a writer has been paid as an advance, and those that do often don’t start paying out until after a full year of sales (if not more). In short royalties are important, but when starting out it is dangerous to rely on royalty cheques to pay the bills.

Rights

Rights, be them foreign or film, are potentially a rich source of income for writers. The problem is that they are unpredictable and often beyond the control of writers. Agents and publishers will wrangle over the rights when a contract is negotiated, and then proceed to try and sell them through their own departments or third party companies. Whether a writer is luckily enough to sell additional rights is largely in the lap of the gods. However, a general rule of thumb (more generalisations, sorry) is that the better a book sells in the home territory (UK, US etc.), the easier the rights will be to sell.

Foreign rights are often the key for many writers to making a full time living. Foreign rights are the rights for a book to be published and sold in another country. What normally happens is a foreign publishing house will pay an upfront, a one off fee for the rights to publish the book. In addition, the writer will also receive a percentage of future sales, in essence a second royalty stream. In terms of figures, we are once again into the realm of generalisations, but you are probably talking £5,000, rather than £50,000. However, three or four foreign rights sales and the writer’s income suddenly starts to become attractive.

Film rights are another potential source of income. What tends to happen here is that a film maker will option a writer’s book. This means a lump of cash is paid for an exclusive period of time in which the book can be turned into a film. If the period lapses, and no film has been made, the rights revert back to the writer (but they keep the cash). So how much can a writer expect to get for an option? The answer is – it varies. The better the book sells in the real world, the higher the option price. You hear stores of hundreds of thousands being paid, but in general terms, for a first time writer, it is more likely to be in the tens of thousands. Read more here.

 

What’s In Your Writing Toolkit?

 

Most writers have established the basic tools that will be utilized moving forward in their process of writing. Of course, taking writing courses and participating in conferences and writing groups are essential and a given. But what about reading? If we are writers we should be reading, and not just books about writing but books written by our favorite authors, as well as discovering new ones.

summer reading

summer reading (Photo credit: ruminatrix)

Jody Hedlund has written a very nice article that points out what writers need in their toolkits.

Do You Have This Important Tool In Your Writer’s Toolkit?

By Jody Hedlund, @JodyHedlund 

I’m currently between manuscripts. I finished editing a book in June, turned it in to my publisher, and now am busily researching my next book.

The research stage is always a bit of a break for me. I don’t have the daily pressure to write a certain number of words. And I don’t need the intense focus required during editing. Even though I try to accomplish several hours of research per day, my daily goals are less intense.

During the research lull between books, I usually attempt to make a dent in my to-be-read pile. While I’ve always considered reading one of life’s greatest pleasures, I’ve also come to realize that as a fiction writer, reading is a necessity in becoming a better writer.

The more a writer reads, the more familiar they become with story-telling. In fact, if you grew up like I did, with a book permanently attached to your hand, then writing fiction is probably somewhat intuitive. You already have a good foundation for what comprises a well-told story, even if you can’t quite put those techniques into fiction-writing lingo.

Even so, I recommend that all writers, no matter how much fiction they’ve read, STILL take the time to familiarize themselves with the craft of writing fiction. Even if we think we know how to write, we’ll only give ourselves even more of an advantage by familiarizing ourselves with story structure, plotting techniques, character building, etc. I find that I pick up new tips every time I read a fiction craft book. Read more here.

 

Do You Trust Your Writing?

Pen and Paper

Pen and Paper (Photo credit: qisur)

Writing isn’t as easy as some people may think. We writers worry and second guess each word we put on a page. We worry that we aren’t good enough, that our work isn’t interesting and we wonder how our favorite writers would tell the same story. If you are wonder how you can learn to trust your writing simply read the article by Australian author Lynda R. Young over at Rachna’s Scriptorium. Lynda has some simple tips to help you begin to trust your writing.

How to Trust Yourself as a Writer
Learn the Rules: Whatever it is in life you want to do, you’ll first need to learn how to do it. The same goes for writing. Sure, anyone can string a few sentences together and call it writing, but not everyone can do it well. Learning the craft will give you the confidence to be the writer you want to be.
Find Support: Find a supportive writing group, a family member who believes in you, a friend who will cheer you on. Keep going back to these people to find the encouragement you will need. They will keep you positive in the face of rejections. They’ll hold you up and tell you the words you need to hear, such as: Yes you made the right decision to pursue writing. Yes you can do this.
Don’t stay in isolation: Writers tend to have a distorted view of their work. We fluctuate from thinking our work is pure genius, to thinking our work is dog’s body. Critique partners, beta readers, editors, and mentors will help to give us a clearer picture of our work. And they will help to improve our work, which in turn will give us confidence. The more we share our work, the easier it becomes. Read more here.