Easy Book Outline Ideas

I really want to be able to create a simple outline for my story. Often times my writing flow gets interrupted because I am so worried about sticking to my outline.  I found some help from a blog post by Bess Weatherby at DYI MFA. She has suggested 4 ways to outline a book that are simple and allow a write to hang on to their free flow of writing.

 

Manuscript Page

Manuscript Page (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Four Methods for Outlining Your Book

by Bess Weatherbypublished in Writing

This is the fourth  post in my series on the benefits of writing with an outline. In my first post, I listed three reasons why most writers need an outline. In the second, I discussed three things to keep in mind when creating an outline. In the third, I talked about how to use one while drafting. In this post, we’ll get into some of the nuts and bolts of different types of outlines.

Let’s start with the obvious: every book is different. And, also obvious: every writer is different. Slightly less obvious: the method of writing each book will be different. Most writers find a system. Sometimes, books blow up that system. At some point, the method that worked for your last book or your best friend or your favorite writer will fail you. Or you’ll discover a new method. Or you’ll realize you’ve let the character drag you kicking and screaming into a murderous subplot you did-not-see-coming! And no one but other writers understands how this can happen.

At this point, I’m often tempted to quote the Cheshire Cat: “We’re all mad here.”

It is in times like these that an outline can be useful. It’s a bridge from your inspiration to the words on the page. A reminder of where you want the story to go. A map. READ MORE HERE.

How to Narrate Your Audio Book With Expression

my headphones

my headphones (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

How to Narrate Your Audio Book With Expression

By 

Are you speaking your audio book as if you were reading it? Reading your book and narrating your book have completely different approaches. The process focuses on your different skills of communication. The most common mistake made when you read a passage out loud is to let your voice drone on through every word in a steady stream with little expression. For your audio version of your book you must use your voice as a tool of interpretation for the meaning behind the words that are written.

Here are three essentials to keep in mind when attempting to record your book or to narrate segments orally to an audience.

#1 is Organization: The first element you must ask yourself is: what am I thinking about in this section of the book? When reading a book you follow the words as your eyes cross each line on the page. You hold in your mind what the images are as the information evolves. It is a passive form of interaction because your eyes run ahead of your mind: you read then think. So, the key here is that you must avoid speaking your words in this pattern and not utter them on one pitch level, or cram too many words in at one time.

Compare this to speaking in conversation with someone. You automatically think first about something that you want to say, and then you speak it. You naturally group your words together according to the thought first. If you wish to tell your friends about something interesting, you allow your voice to get excited about it, and you chunk your thoughts randomly in conversation. Therefore, when narrating your audio text you need to group only one idea and the words belonging to that idea, then speak it. Take time to embrace each new idea. Speak as if you want your listener to feel the moment with you. If you do this, you will be reading more naturally and easily.

#2 is Expression: The second element is to take your thought segments and show surprise, excitement, curiosity, fear, joy, wonder, sadness, enjoyment, or any other emotions to give certain words the force that is needed. Your expression should be natural as if discovering the text for the first time. Think of the image that you may have seen before and reproduce it through your voice. You are using your thinking processes actively when narrating audio books and awakening the pictures in your mind to pass onto the listener through your tone.

To practise this skill of sensory expression, observe and imagine, and then describe any object of nature that you might encounter on a short walk outside your home; such as, a leaf, a flower, a bird, or a blade of grass. Speak expressively about the details of these items. Remember your listeners do not have the text of the book to check out the details. This is a great exercise to tune your voice inflection and observation skills. You use your breathing skills and tone of voice to create the pictures and feelings in the words of your book.

#3 is Pace: The third element to be aware of is the pace that you speak and the clarity of your words. Not all audio books contain descriptive environments or characters and dialogue which require extreme expressive tones. To narrate a documentary, an educational textbook, how-to manuals, or staff training materials, you still need to group the ideas or steps accordingly, and give expression throughout. However, you must be clear on the pronunciations of your words, or specialized industry terms and understand what the concept is. For example, any audio book of medical, scientific, engineering, or some other unique genre needs to be correctly and clearly spoken.

In addition, you will find that a slower pace works best so the endings of words are not dropped or rushed together. Your pace will only enhance your tone and your expression ranging from a serious tone of importance, to a neutral tone as a bridge, to an example, story, or data of information. Pace for speaking all types of audio materials whether fiction or non-fiction is important to the image, feelings, and facts that need to resonate with the listener.

The professional audio voice-over talent must use all the mental, physical, and vocal skills to get the right balance for the listeners. They are experienced oral readers trained in the skills of how to expand the capacity of breath control, how to group phrases to make it the ideas connect, how to find the key words to give expression with matching the pace, to give an overall tone that works.

If you have written your book and want to do the narration yourself, then be sure to get some professional coaching; or better still, hire a professional narrator. You want to match the high quality of your content to the high quality of your audio version. Your listeners will vary from people who listen while they drive, to busy people who can listen and multi-task, and to the blind who are studying school texts or listening to fictional literature. Voice-over skills for narrating your audio book can be learned but it’s not something that you can wing it and get it right!

Did you find this article helpful? If want a professional audio narrator, training, or personal coaching for vocal expression then check us out at http://www.VoicePowerTraining.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Brenda_C._Smith

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7501353

Writing To The Finish

Struggling to put words on the page are what every writer goes through. It doesn’t matter if you have an idea of what you want to write, getting the words in the precise order is sometimes a problem. It’s what keeps some of us up at night. Over at The Blood Red Pencil, I discovered some interesting tips on helping writers get through the first draft and to the finish line.

English: Delfo Cabrera is winning marathon at ...

English: Delfo Cabrera is winning marathon at 1948 Olympic Summer Games (London). The photo was front page of Clarín, main Argentine newspaper, on August 14th, 1948. Español: Delfo Cabrera gana la maratón en los Juegos Olímpicos de Verano de 1948 (London). La foto fue tapa de Clarín, principal periódico argentino, el 14 de agosto de 1948. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Writer’s Marathon

If you’re a fan of the Olympics like I am, writing during this time comes with its own set of challenges. I am also lucky enough this summer to be only an hour and a half outside of London. Now add to this mix that I am straining to run the writer’s version of the marathon – finish a first draft before I return home to family responsibilities in two weeks.Exciting times. Let me share with you ten things which I have learned to help you complete your first draft.10. Stop fixating on your word count. Just write your story. Easy to say; tricky to do.9. Resist the urge to hit that shiny delete button.

8. Remind yourself it’s your decision when to put your story in front of someone else’s eyes. Until then, it’s just you. But really …

7.5 Don’t show anyone your first draft. Trust me on this one.

7. Have a daily goal. It’s up to you how ambitious it is, but aim low. The glow of passing that goal could keep you warm on a frozen winter’s night.

6. Don’t compare your output to anyone else’s. There’s no win here. Again, trust me. Read more here.