Book Blogger Survey: The results of a survey of 502 book bloggers

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Review:

If authors and publishers aren’t aware how much book bloggers can help a book get noticed, then they should read this 2016 Book Blogger Survey. Barb Drozdowich has complied information from 502 bloggers who share why they love being book bloggers and reviewers. She asks these bloggers seemingly simple questions but the answers are thought provoking and informative.

The survey had 38 questions and on average took responders about 9 minutes to complete. What Drozdowich put together is a compilation of important percentages that show the value of book bloggers.  These percentages prove to authors and publishers the importance of the help they can get from bloggers and how dedicated bloggers are about reading and promoting books.

These survey’s also share the participation from book bloggers from around the world. This proves authors can be promoted globally. Readers will see that 75% of book bloggers participate in blog tours. Also 96% of these bloggers post their reviews to Amazon, Goodreads and other popular social media sites. Another interesting tidbit found was that book bloggers, 94% of them, read other book blogs. What this means is that bloggers want to become familiar with what other bloggers are sharing. As an author or publisher this is important because book blogger do purchase books and read for pleasure not just for reviewing. Basically, book reviewers buy books.

 

As a participant in this survey it’s important for authors and publishers to know that we book bloggers are serious about what we do. We actively build readership and we have the necessary power to help promote books and most importantly we love doing it. This survey provides so many valuable figures to authors and publishers and helps them better understand the need for book bloggers.

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Author Jim Lynch On Writing

It finally has sunken in that when I am writing I need to focus on writing a book that I would like to read. Researching ideas is a good idea, but Jim mentions that it is a favorite way to procrastinate. I agree, I do this a lot. I hope you enjoy this short video on writing tips from authro Jim Lynch.

A Visual Guide To Writing

Sometimes reading about writing can get a little old. So, I found a video that will walk you through the process of writing. You may have seen this before, but take a moment to enjoy the efforts of the artist. It’s a bit long but worth every minute. Enjoy!

 

Have You Considered Crowdfunding?

There is a new way for authors to get help, support and even readers for their projects and it’s called crowdfunding. If you don’t know what it is or not sure how to do it, Book Daily offers some great tips.

 

Crowd at Fair

Crowd at Fair (Photo credit: RaeAllen)

 

Crowdfunding: The Newest Step In The Publishing Process

In order to be successful in the book market, authors need to not only be good writers, but they need to be business savvy, too. Luckily, there are many tools available that can help an author succeed, and one of the newer options is crowdfunding. Crowdfunding is the practice of funding a project or venture by raising many small amounts of money from a large number of people, typically via the Internet.

First thing’s first. Publishing costs can accumulate quickly and if an author is self-publishing, they are personally responsible to pay for the costs out of pocket. This is where crowdfunding can become extremely beneficial to the self-publishing author. By providing authors with the means to raise funds before they begin the publishing process, crowdfunding greatly mitigates the risk and financial burden of publishing. Read more here.

 

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How Should Writers Toss The Adverb?

Writing with minimal words to get your point across to the reader can be challenging for any writer. Over at Words In The Treehouse, Trish Nicolson has some great tips on how to make your point without saying alot and making sure your reader gets it.

 

Adverbs MyThoughts Mind Map

Adverbs MyThoughts Mind Map (Photo credit: MyThoughtsMindMaps)

 

How to Write Without Adverbs

This morning’s email from a friend, written in panic, and ending with “Help!” was sparked by advice from the judge of a story competition he wanted to enter. The advice was this: ‘Do not use adverbs.’

“But the second word of my story is an adverb!” he wailed, “Why can’t I use it? Why? Why?”This morning’s email from a friend, written in panic, and ending with “Help!” was sparked by advice from the judge of a story competition he wanted to enter. The advice was this: ‘Do not use adverbs.’

My breakfast sat on the table, my tummy rumbled, but a friend in need turns congealed porridge and cold tea to no account. I clattered out this advice on the keyboard:

An ‘ad-verb’ is added to a verb to condition it: make it stronger, say more, be more explicit. If you need to use an adverb; if you have to prop the verb up with a walking stick or a rod stuck down its spine, you are using the wrong verb – it is too weak to do the job you want it to do.  Stronger, appropriate verbs that say and do precisely what you want them to say and do, without face-lifts and crutches, give zest to your writing. And cutting adverbs reduces your word count. Read more here.

 

 

 

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